The Blog

The History of Gibson’s “Burst” by Year

May 16, 2024

Nearly 70 years after the first Sunburst Les Paul, hardly any other model rivals the desirability and fame of the iconic “Burst” produced from 1958-1960. At Well Strung Guitars, we’re incredibly fortunate to have several examples from each year of Burst production. In the following text, we’ll describe the year-to-year differences during this golden age… Read More…

Guitar Highlight: Jack Penewell’s 1932 Gibson Twin-Six

March 27, 2024

We’re honored to have such an incredible piece of history – this remarkable guitar is a 1932 Gibson “Twin-Six” Double Neck, custom-made for guitarist Jack Penewell. Born in 1897 in Madison, Wisconsin, Penewell began learning lap-steel guitar in high school, and it wasn’t much longer until he was performing in Vaudeville acts throughout the country…. Read More…

Guitar Highlights: Sandy Coker’s Leather Wrapped 1959 Telecaster

February 6, 2024

In the early 1950s, a new fad emerged that still excites and awes us to this very day; the hand tooled leather wrapped guitar! Deeply rooted in Country and Western, the leather wrapped guitar style became a way for stars to promote their brand and style. It paired extremely well with cowboy boots, hats and… Read More…

Gear Breakdown: The Beatles Rooftop Concert

January 12, 2024

Of all the legendary performances throughout the 1960s, few matched the spontaneity and uniqueness of the Beatles’ January 1969 concert on top of Apple Corps HQ in London. With the 55th Anniversary of the concert coming up at the end of this month, we felt it only fitting to spotlight this legendary event. With cables… Read More…

Gibson’s “Original Custom Shop”: 1964 Tenor SG

December 8, 2023

In the early ’60s, a teenage Charlie Wood wrote a letter to Gibson. In 2011, the same Charlie Wood, a little older and far wiser, wrote another letter. With the former letter, he ordered an instrument, and with the latter, he sold it. Upon ordering, the instrument Wood received wasn’t a standard catalog guitar but… Read More…

Guitar Highlights: Fender’s 1950 Dual Pickup Esquire Prototype

November 2, 2023

It’s hard to picture the guitar market before Fender’s iconic Broadcaster/Telecaster formally entered the scene. So, imagine our sheer awe when we opened an original thermometer case to view one of Fender’s earliest prototypes – an authentic piece of music history. Pinning down an exact timeline can be difficult, especially when a guitar has passed… Read More…

The Anatomy of Gibson’s Non-Reverse Firebirds

October 6, 2023

If you’ve been keeping up with our blogs, you may have read our previous post, “The Anatomy of Gibson’s Reverse Firebirds.” This post is a companion and continuation of this topic, so check it out for all your Reverse authentication needs!  Though Gibson originally had high hopes for the new solid body model, their debut… Read More…

Jumpin’ Bill Carlisle’s 1954 Gibson J-185

August 31, 2023

Sometimes, you come across a vintage guitar whose history has been lost with time. With every hand it passes through, the original owner’s story is gradually whittled down until what was once a redwood is now a twig. And yet, sometimes, you are lucky enough to find a guitar with a history that is so… Read More…

Early Guitar Plastics

August 4, 2023

Throughout the 20th-century guitar-building golden age, manufacturers continually pushed the envelope with their instruments’ craftsmanship, playability, and use of emerging materials, namely their plastics. At present, it’s outlandish to think plastic goods were once considered rare. However, it wasn’t until World War II that plastic was brought to the forefront of manufacturing materials. Before plastic,… Read More…

The Greatest Guitar Finds: Crazy For Coral

July 5, 2023

As you may well know, buying for our shop has given me some of my life’s most extraordinary tales and adventures. This story takes us back to the early 2010s in New Jersey with my former business partner, Richie, at We Buy Guitars.  On November 30th, 2013, we received a call from our friend at… Read More…